Angela Y. Walton-Raji on April 3rd, 2015

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Welcome back to this week’s episode of the African Roots Podcast.  You can always reach me at African Roots Podcast.

PodcastAnniversary
Well this is an anniversary broadcast for me—this is the 6th anniversary of the African Roots Podcast! Yes—six  years ago this week, I began this podcast and I am amazed myself that I am still here going at it week after week! Thanks to you and the wonderful support that I have received over the years from so many of you. And note six years of continuous weekly podcasts makes this the longest continually running podcast in the genealogy community! But none of it was possible without you and your continuous support.
As this is an anniversary for me, I am willing to entertain some new ideas from you, if there are features that you would like to see added to the podcast, I am surely willing to entertain those suggestions.

I will be adding book reviews to the podcast as I had once done when I began the podcast, so if there are books to share, let me know, as I am always delighted to share a good read with others.

******************************************************************************************

Happy Easter

This is also Holy Week and many of you will be celebrating Easter this weekend. I hope that you have a good time with family and loved ones. Some are also rushing out today for Good Friday services I am sure, so I do hope that you will have a blessed Easter weekend.

******************************************************************************************

ArkCivilWar

Spring events, from national conferences, state conferences as well. I am looking forward to speaking in Arkansas at the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission event on April 18th. I will be speaking about Freedom and how freedom came to those enslaved, in the state of Arkansas. I look forward to seeing old friends there.

****************************************************************************************

PGAAHGS

Save the Date June 6th, the Prince George’s County Chapter of AAGHS along with the Prince Georges Historical Society will be hosting the Juneteenth. Note that this is an all-day long seminar, and the keynote speaker is Char McCargo Bah, who is well known in this area as a researchers, genealogist and author.

****************************************************************************************

MemorabiliaShow

The annual Black Memorabilia Show will unfold next week in Gaithersburg Maryland. This is always an interesting event and there is usually something for everyone, old books, historical documents, photographs, Negro League items, and so much more. Worth attending.

****************************************************************************************

I want to mention that all of the videos taped in Salt Lake City at RootsTech are now featured on the Family Search website together. Most were interviews conducted by Bernice Bennett, and also one I also conducted. The Roots Tech experience was amazing and one in which I would urge many of you to consider attending at least once. There was something for everyone, beginners, and experienced as well. Roots Tech is in Salt Lake City in February and worth the experience. So much was going on. Take a look at the videos and get a feeling of what unfolded there.

****************************************************************************************

FB Groups

Speaking of the genealogy community—I am continually impressed with the kinds of items, articles and information shared on social media. Often members of the community share articles that  they find with a larger audience. This kind of article provides an opportunity for research. One article was about a group of slaves who walked 50 miles away from the plantation where they were so cruelly treated by the overseer. This story of resistance provides an opportunity for a tenatious researcher to explore the story, and the history of the plantation.  The story of their resistance is an amazing one and I hope that a good Louisiana researcher will tell that story. This is an advantage of social media, where a member of the FB group was looking at Ohio newspapers and shared it with everyone. If you are not a member, join AfriGeneas, join OBA and others. You never know if a new and interesting, project might emerge for you.

******************************************************************************************

BOOK REVIEW:
Cherokee Rose by Tiya Miles

Book Cherokee Rose

Cherokee Rose is a book that caught my attention, because it is an area in which many African Americans feel is part of their history.  She looks at descendants of people with connections to Cherokee and Creek Indians. She bases the story loosely on the history of the Chief Vann House, in Georgia. But she brings it to light in the lives of 3 women of color who all have ties to the Georgia plantation!

My interest is based on my own family history as Choctaw Freedmen, who were slaves in the Choctaw Nation. I will say that this is a treat, to get a glimpse of life before removal of those who were enslaved in the Five Civilized Tribes. This provides a glimpse of life on an Indian slave-holding mansion. The James Hold plantation in the book, is a fictionalized version of the real James Vann estate. The family upon whom the story is loosely based was the Vann family, a wealthy slave holding. The three main characters are people whom we would see in life–professional woman, of means, another who has ties from the Muscogee Creek Nation, and another–a writer. All of the characters found a strong interest and an unusual bond. The book wanders between places in time, from the present to the plantation era, through the words of the people of the past. So well written and those with ties to Oklahoma, or parts of the south and south east. I have to thank Dr. Tiya Miles for writing this story. Now for those who are interested in the historical background of the Chief Vann house, can read her work The House on Diamond Hill.

We don’t see enough stories where we as a people move beyond being more than simply victims of cruelty.  I urge you to obtain a copy of the book, as I think it is an excellent one to have in your library.
******************************************************************************************

Well as I wind it down this week again I must thank you for joining me in this 6th anniversary podcast! I look forward to seeing many of you in the upcoming weeks.

Until then, keep researching keep documenting, and keeps sharing what you find.

Angela Y. Walton-Raji on March 27th, 2015

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Welcome back to this week’s episode of the African Roots Podcast! You can always reach me at African Roots Podcast.

Well, I hope you are all doing well. Can you believe it that March is almost gone and April quickly approaches. I am between speaking engagements and last week I had a wonderful time at the Enoch Pratt Library last week. I gave four presentations and everyone was wonderful, great questions and a special thanks to the staff at Enoch Pratt Library at the Southeast Anchor Branch.

ArkCivilWar

I am now preparing to travel to my home state of Arkansas where I will be speaking at the Arkansas Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission and I shall address how Freedom came to the enslaved population of that state. My goal is to bring the stories of freedom to the community, and as I always say, “it’s all about the stories.”

****************************************************************************************

Fairfax

Yes, its spring and here in Maryland, that means that it is almost time for the Fairfax County genealogy society conference. It unfolds every spring, and that event always brings a learning experience to those in attendance.

*****************************************************************************************

This week in social media quite a few people have been sharing stories from old newspapers. I want to thank Renate Sanders for sharing stories about people once enslaved and how their lives were reflected in the press.

******************************************************************************************

Bernice's Logo

Do you have immigrant ancestors? Perhaps ancestors who came to the US from Cuba, Puerto  Rico, or possibly from Jamaica, Trinidad, Barbados? Well last night’s guest on Bernice Bennett’s program, was an interesting guest who spoke about Ellis Island? Why? Because many people have a misconception, about names. And contrary to what is believed, “your ancestor’s name was not changed at Ellis Island.” Her guest last night was Kenneth Bravo, who spoke about Ellis Island and immigration records. He also explained how some errors exist in the way a name was indexed, but the name was not changed by people at Ellis Island. Tune in and listen. Her show airs every week on Blog Talk Radio. 

******************************************************************************************

MtLebanonQuilt(courtesy of Regina Spencer)

Congratulations to the members of Mt. Lebanon Baptist Church in Baltimore for the beautiful heritage quilt that was completed. Ms. Regina Spencer, who conducts the Adoptions Forum is very active in a genealogy and heritage effort at her church. She oversaw the project, as she has overseen other interesting heritage projects as well.  You may recall about two years ago, she exposed several young children to an appreciation of history and genealogy as well. Her quilt project involved numerous church members and the eldest participant in the quilt project is 97 years old! Good job Regina!

*****************************************************************************************

DrusillasPlayArticle(Article from Daily Press about play produced by genealogist Drusilla Pair.)
Daily Press, June 17, 2014  

Are you incorporating your multiple interests and merging them with genealogy? I know a researcher in Virginia Drusilla Pair has taken her love of writing and history and become a playwright. I marvel at how people have combined their talents and made it work. Another researcher in Maryland is great a crafting, and has started to make family heritage scrapbooks for her family and is now taking orders to reproduce them. I am truly impressed with the talents shown by the genealogy community.

*****************************************************************************************

UNTPortalTXHistory

I learned about a wonderful website offering dozens of super newspaper links.
There are over 400 links to historically African American newspapers that are all digitized. Some are single issues, but some are multiple issues. This comes from a University of North Texas website. Amazing publications from church papers to long forgotten local newspapers. The Africo-American Presbyterian newspapers was one of them. In addition to this paper, I even saw a publication from my home state of Arkansas.  Only one volume of this paper, but what a treat to see this publication. There are dozens from Raleigh North Carolina, Carolina, Atlanta, and so many more. Don’t forget to look at the ads in the newspapers, even if you don’t find your own people there. You may be surprised to learn that your ancestors knew the person whose ad caught your eye. Take a look at this site–this is a real gem!

*****************************************************************************************

Well I have to wind down and get back into a presentation mode once again, as I will be traveling in about 3 weeks to Little Rock. So thank you for listening, know that you are appreciated for taking time to tune in to me once again. In the meantime, keep researching, keep documenting, and always keeps sharing what you find!