Angela Y. Walton-Raji on August 7th, 2015

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Hello, and welcome back to the African Roots Podcast! You can always reach me at AfricanRootsPodcast@gmail.com

I hope that you have all had a good week and that the weekend promises to be a good one for you also. I know that family reunions are going on all over the country and if you are having one, that you make wonderful memories and have a joyous time with family and loved ones. And as summer is beginning to wind down and school will be starting soon I hope you get those many things done that preparation for a new academic year brings.

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Noted Researcher Presents Two Part Genealogy Event in Alexandria Virginia

CharBah

This Saturday and next, a two part series on using vital records will be presented by noted genealogist Char McCargo Bah, at the Alexandria Virginia Black History Museum. The event is open to the public and will unfold at 11 am, till 1pm. As you may know, Char Bah has done extensive work on northern Virginia history and Alexandria and its rich history.

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Bernice's Logo

Last night’s episode of Bernice Bennett’s show with Linda Nance of the Annie Malone Historical Society. Annie Malone was a pioneer in the African American hair care industry. But her legacy extends beyond that. Much fascinating history of this amazing lady was shared with listeners. It was as uplifting as Annie Malone herself was. Ms. Bennett’s show airs every Thursday evening at 9pm eastern time, on Blog Talk Radio.

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LegacyFamilyTreeWebinars

If you missed the Family Tree Webinar last week with Melvin Collier, I hope that you will have a chance to go and catch it. This was the third in a four-part series on the webinar channel called The Freedom Series. This was an outstanding presentation that was made. His focus illustrated how he was able to put together data that re-united descendants of one slave whose family was separated by slavery. It was outstanding.
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FreedBureauFSMLaborContracts(sample labor contract from the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands)

What are “Black” Records? A Discussion

Lots of energy unfolding this weeek in social media. Good questions, good dialogue and great interaction among researchers has been unfolding. Well this week on Facebook, a good discussion occurred this week. One member asked about records for African American genealogy and wanted to ask about why there were not more “black” records. Her concern that records were being “withheld” by sites such as Ancestry. It was pointed out that there are no records that can be called “black records”. It was an interesting discussion. I began to think after reading the thread I began to ask what kinds of records are out there that are uniquely African ancestored records, or records that were generated mostly by people of color. Of course vital records reflect people of all backgrounds. But there are some unique records that describe mostly African ancestored people. For example the Freedmen’s Bureau records were generated by people of color. But on those records are people of other background as well. Employers, bureau agency staff also have their names reflected as well.

But then, what are those unique records? Among some of the African-ancestored created records created by formerly enslaved people, one will find, 1) Labor contracts, 2) Co-habitation records 3) marriage records 4) Contraband camp rosters 5) Freedmen Hospital records, 6) Transportation records 7) Child recovery records, and so much more, 8) Slave bills of sale, 9) Freedmen’s Bank Records and also there are 10) embedded records which are large records of Black people embedded in other groups. US Colored Troops can be considered black people-generated records, also Oklahoma Freedmen records can also be considered a large record set, reflecting 14,000 records of once enslaved Oklahomans and their children.

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Well time to wind down, thank you for taking time from your schedule to tune in and listen this week. I have a writing project in which I am immersed. I am impressed with the large number of people who have committed to on-going writing projects that they have started since this summer’s MAAGI. Thank you so much for being here, and of course without you, there would be no podcast.  Remember to join the indexing project. Again, thank you for tuning in once again. In the meantime, have a great week of research, and remember to keep researching, keep documenting, and keep sharing what you find.

Angela Y. Walton-Raji on July 31st, 2015

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Welcome back to this week’s episode of the African Roots Podcast! You can reach me, at African Roots Podcast.

ReunionTree

A warm shout out to people who are attending family reunions this weekend, as August is here tomorrow. A particular shout out to the Atlas Family that had an amazing reunion last week. Lots of photos on Facebook with them. And a special shout out, to the Taylor Family of Rocky Mount North Carolina. This family has had family reunions consecutively for the past 64 or so years, and it is amazing. I attended their 50th anniversary reunion and it was a wonderful experience. They had the traditional Friday evening fish fry and the Saturday banquet, so best wishes to them this weekend!
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FTM Best Websites2015

So excited to share with you that the Mapping the Freedmen’s Bureau project has been named as one of the 101 Top Genealogy Websites. The site is less than a year old and Toni Carrier and myself are honored to see that our work reflecting Record Group 105 has been honored. The Mapping the Freedmen’s Bureau was created to give researchers a tool to help determine whether ancestors lived near a bureau which was really part of the Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands. We looked at the critical years between 1865 and the early 1870s and the he bureau is amazing in terms of the types of records need to be investigated. There are marriage records, marriage ledgers, contracts, employer-employee rosters and so much more. These records answer so many questions for all of us and they give us a glimpse into what really happened. I hope therefore that you will use Mapping The Freedmen’s Bureau

The site was expanded to include other facilities beyond the Field offices of the Bureau. We have included the Freedmen’s Bank, the hospitals, and did your ancestors have children who attended freedmen schools? Take a look at the site and see if it can help you. And a special thanks to Family Tree Magazine for the honor.
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LegacyFamilyTreeWebinars

Today at 2:00 pm Eastern time, you can listen to Melvin Collier on Legacy Family Tree Webinars. This is part of the Freedom series, that are offered by FamilyTreeWebinars. Melvin’s topic is Reconstructing Family Trees that were Sawed by Slavery. He is the author of Mississippi to Africa, and 150 Years Later, a Family Reunited. He is an excellent presenter. With Melvin, you will find that he is an excellent presenter, an excellent teacher, and you will learn a lot from him.
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DiscoverFreedomLogo

Are you indexing? I am referring to the on-going indexing project. If the 1940 census was indexed in less than 2 years, then we can get the Freedmen’s Bureau indexed. All people are asked to join this amazing effort. The records are truly something to explore. One kind of record set that is not often metnioned are the requests to reclaim children. The Freedmen’s Bureau had to intervene to retrieve over 3000 children to have them returned to their parents.

BerniceShow2
To learn more about this–last night’s episode of Bernice Bennett’s show featured Judy Russell, who mentioned the situation of the children seized by former slave holders.  This was truly interesting. As you know Ms. Bennett’s show airs every Thursday evening at 9pm eastern time, on Blog Talk Radio.

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ReclaimingKin

Well there is a new book that you need to have. Well—Robyn Smith a highly skilled genealogist has published a new book. It is called “The Best of Reclaiming Kin” .  Ms. Smith has taken her blog and turned it into a very useful book. It is a large sized book–over 200 pages. I have to commend her for what she has done, and she has done an amazing job. Her index is full and very useful. A good index makes a work like this particularly useful. You need to have this book in your collection.

And–do you have your own blog? Well, perhaps you may want to put the blog now on paper, and Robyn Smith’s book is a great model for you to follow. Look at what she has done. The value of putting it on paper is enormous. We know that many in our own circle are not blog savvy. Well by putting it on paper, she will be able to share with more readers. You can get copies from Reclaiming Kin.

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Somerset

August is here, and it is time for me to re-read one of my favorite books–Somerset Homecoming. I find this memoir of Dorothy Spruill Redford’s research journey always refreshing and inspiring. I keep this book on my annual TBR list (“To-Be-Read”).

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Thank you for taking time out to listen to my podcast, and know that you are appreciated. In the meantime, have a great week, and remember to keep researching, keep documented and to keep sharing what you find.