African Roots Podcast #8 May 22, 2009

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Welcome back to the AfricanRootsPodcast!
You can reach me at africanrootspodcast@gmail.com
My name is Angela Walton-Raji

Our concerns and prayers are expressed for the restoration of the Madison County Indiana Courthouse that was recently devastated by a terrible fire this week. Information about the situation in Madison County can be found at this site.

The National Archives will host a genealogy workshop on Saturday May 30, 2009 with presenters Reginald Washington and Deborah Daniels of American Legacy Magazine. Reservations are required by calling Call 202-357-5333. The cost for this event is $20.00

Deadline is June 30th for those submitting an entry to the Leon County Florida Heritage Book. For more information contact Leon County Heritage Book Committee.

Several workshops are offered this summer at the New York National Archives facility. These are lunchtime workshops and you can find information on them here. In addition there is an evening workshop coming up, in Pittsfield MA on African American genealogy, on July 22.
Information about the workshop in Pittsfield MA is located on this site.

Selected clips from the Louis Armstong Jazz Oral History Project can be heard on the site of the New York Public Library.

The Missouri State Archives continues to offer many resources for African American Genealogists.
For African Americans of NE Missouri some articles and photographs will be of interest to many.

Explore the wonderful music history of Kansas City and learn about the African American Musicisians Union Local #627 at the University of Missouri Kansas City’s site devoted to Kansas City Jazz.

Learn about Black families of the Ozarks on another site, depicting African American families and history from Ozark Mountain communities.

Some impressive portraits of African Americans in Missouri from 1880 to 1920 are definitely worth exploring.

Those interested in the history of the British perspective of the Atlantic Slave trade and those wishing to learn about the abolitionist movement in Britian will find these two sites to hold plenty of information. One site is Ancestors Magazine an interesting British publication, and the other is the National Archives of the UK.

As usuall Footnote.com continues to offer more resources for genealogists. Visit their holdings for new death records and the new holdings from the Freedman’s Bank.

The six phases of African American genealogy present more challenges as one moves into the phases of documenting ancestors from the era of slavery. These resources may prove useful for you:

Redford, Dorothy Spruill. Somerset Homecoming: Recovering A Lost Heritage. New York: Doubleday, 1988

Woodtor, Dee Parmer. Finding A Place Called Home: A Guide to African-American Genealogy and Historical Identity. New York: Random House,1999

Streets, David H., Slave Genealogy a Research Guide with Case Studies Bowie MD: Heritage Books, 1986.

Fears, Mary Jackson, Slave Ancestral Research, It’s Something Else Bowie MD: Heritage Books, 1995

4 Comments

  1. Vicky
    Posted May 26, 2009 at 5:27 pm | Permalink

    I am proud to say that Isiaah Mayes a Buffalo Soldier who died in 1925 and was buried in a paupers grave here in Arizona was finally given his rightful place in Arlington. His remains were exumed and escorted by a motorcyle brigade. What a fitting Memorial Day Tribute

  2. Posted May 26, 2009 at 5:31 pm | Permalink

    Wow Vicky,

    What an interesting story! Was there any press coverage of the event?

    -Angela-

  3. Posted June 1, 2009 at 1:42 pm | Permalink

    Another resource which will take readers into a genealogical journey back into slavery, breaking down numerous brick walls that enabled the author to go back a number of generations in slavery, is “Mississippi to Africa: A Journey of Discovery,” Heritage Books, 2008. See http://www.MississippitoAfrica.com for details.

  4. Posted June 2, 2009 at 2:33 am | Permalink

    These events are very inspiring and I hope to add the story of Alex Davis to this page after I get the details of his trek to Oklahoma from Mississippi. He was a Choctaw on the Dawes Roll.

    Carol

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