African Roots Podcast #121 July 29, 2011

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Hello and welcome back. You can always reach me at africanrootspodcast@gmail.com.

Announcements:
Boston University’s Center for Professional Education has added a new introductory level course, Genealogical Essentials, to its Genealogical Research Program. The new course, which starts in September, is geared toward newer genealogists or experienced genealogists who have gaps in their education. Title: Genealogical Essentials Targeted Audience: The class is geared toward beginners, including those who have little genealogically research experience. Pre-Requisites: There are no genealogical pre-requisites, however, students should have familiarity with a computer keyboard and Microsoft Word. High speed internet access would also be helpful.

Enrollment Deadline: August 18, 2011. Enrollment is limited. For those who do not find a slot in the fall class, there will be another class in January 2012. Class Start Date: Tuesday, September 6, 2011.

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Have you thought about taking a DNA test? There are many kinds of tests, and I am speaking about the admixture test. Well the company 23&me is offering 10,000 kits for free as part of an African American initiative. Roots into the Future will help determine how genetic factors contribute to the development of disease in this population. Roots into the Future will launch at the end of July at the annual conference of the National Urban League in Boston. To learn more about the project, or to sign up to be notified when registration becomes more broadly available, go to www.23andme.com/roots.

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Baltimore AAHGS chapter is planning a visit to the Faquier county African American Museum on August 6, 2011. They are combining the outing with a visit to the Afr. American festival in Manassas, VA. For information contact Dr. Donna Hollie at DTH1800@aol.com

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Melvin Collier who many of us know from his work on his family line and his book Mississippi to Africa, has done it again. That’s right—he has written a book on his family history—but from a unique line—-he is talking about the re-uniting of a family that was separated 150 years ago. We know how slavery separated families—people were simply shipped off to places unknown—and never saw loved ones ever again. This happned in Abbeyville SC 150 years ago. After emancipation, those sent away never made it back but through the meticulous research that Melvin Collier has done—he found a branch of the family that had been taken away. But beyond that—–he also was able to facilitate a coming together of those family lines. His new book 150 Years Later, is now available through Amazon.com, or you can order it directly on his website.

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There will be a fundraiser cruise to benefit the Louis Diggs African American Cultural Resource Center. The Pest House is an historic building that sits on the grounds of the Baltimore County Historical Society. This particular building was used to house those persons suffering from incurable diseases. Earlier this year, the site was given to Louis Digss a well known historian who has documented more than 9 historically black neighborhoods in Baltimore County. It was given to him by the Historical Society of Baltimore County. Well the building is in need of restoration, and a fund raising cruise is being planned for January. A series of meetings are being planned and I do urge persons in the greater Baltimore area to attend. One meeting took place this week, and another one is being planned in September. When the date is secure, I shall announce it here.

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A shout out is given to persons way up the Atlantic Coast in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The former residents of Africville are celebrating their history. This community was destroyed in the name of “progress” when it was decided that this quiet settlement had to go. The Africville Genealogy Society was formed in 1983 by Deborah Dixon-Jones, Linda Mantley and Brenda Steed-Ross. These women were among the community of 400 people evicted from their homes during the relocation process in the late ’60s. This community thrived for decades in the Bedford Basin and is now gone in the name of progress and urban renewal. Relocation separated the close friends since childhood, but did not break their spirit to be together. They are having annual reunion and gathering this weekend in Halifax, so this is to salute them.

Well, thanks for listening folks. Have a great week, and keep doing what you do—keep researching, keep documenting and keep sharing what you find.

http://www.africville.ca/

http://www.africville.ca/society/picnic_schedule.html

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