Monthly Archives: September 2013

African Roots Podcast Episode #234 September 27, 2013

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Welcome back to the African Roots Podcast!
You can always reach me at AfricanRootsPodcast@gmail.com

Well the end of September quickly approaches and October is almost here. I am reminded of the poem, “30 days have September” —well that means that autumn is here and bringing everything with it—cooler temperatures, shorter days, brilliant colors, and yes—-CONFERENCES! The fall genealogy season has arrived! And also tomorrow—if you live between Northern Virginia and Baltimore, I hope you will be able to make it to Columbia MD and go and hear Melvin Collier, author, blogger, and genealogist speak at the Central MD AAHGS monthly meeting. His focus is Slave Ancestral Research—Breaking down that 1870 Brick Wall. This takes place at 1:00 pm at the Owen Brown Community Center in Columbia MD on Cradelrock Way.

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Ok for those of you who are looking for an opportunity—there is still chance to submit a proposal to speak at the Southern California Genealogy Jamboree! The Jamboree is one of the three Big Three events—and I had the honor to speak there this past June! What a great time!!! The Call for Papers deadline is October 1, so do try to make sure that you get your proposals in on time! So get yours in by next week!

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The Baltimore Family Reunion Expo will take place at Isaac Myers Park in Baltimore City. The EXPO is really designed for family reunion planners looking to Baltimore as the host city for future reunions. But it is also a family day, offering entertainment, and celebrity entertainers as well. So it looks like a great way to have an outing with the family.

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Only we are now only 2 weeks away from the AAHGS Conference in Nashville TN. How exciting this will be. There is still plenty of time to register for this event, and I think that it promises to be a fascinating experience for everyone.
Aahgs.org has a link to the conference website. Also note that there will be some tours as well as opportunities to conduct some genealogical research. Don’t miss this great opportunity to see Tennesee!
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Have you been looking for something new–or a new direction to take your research? Perhaps Forensic genealogy might be the way for you to go. This might take you into a direction of searching for missing heirs, descendants in cold cases, and other similar endeavors. But the difference is that this kind of research may be part of a court case unfolding. But where does one learn how to do that? Well, perhaps Forensic Genealogy Institute, might assist you. The Forensic Genealogy Institute (FGI) is the educational arm of the Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy. Foundations in Forensic Genealogy offers a detailed overview of the profession. The Advanced Forensic Evidence Analysis track presents opportunities to develop advanced skills. Each track offers in excess of twenty hours of significant hands-on instruction with real-world work examples, resources, sample forms and work materials. Completion of Foundations in Forensic Genealogy is a prerequisite to attending Advanced Forensic Evidence Analysis. Those who satisfactorily complete either course receive a Forensic Genealogy Institute Certificate of Completion.

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I have to make a correction on something. Two weeks ago, I mentioned the Battle of Lake Erie and the project being conducted by the Center for Black Genealogy. I want to correct the numbers—the battle consisted of 600 men who fought in that battle. Estimates are from ten to twenty-five percent of the men were Black. However, because naval records did not indicate race, historians have only identified eleven men by name. The goal is to identify more of them. Special thanks to Tony Burroughs for the clarification. We shall be interested in looking more closely at the data as they uncover more about the battle and the Black men who fought in that battle.

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Last night’s Blog Radio program with Bernice Bennett was a good one. Dr. Barbara Krauthamer associate professor from the University of Massachusetts was there, speaking about her book, “Black Slaves, Indian Masters”. The conversation was an interesting one, and focused on her research exploring the policies that affected the lives of African slaves in Indian Territory. This is a most under-researched, and under-explored aspect of American history. Dr. Krauthamer’s book is one of many that have appeared in recent years exploring this history. It is a good thing to see that there was strong mention of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Freedmen, two categories of which have not been explored very much in recent years. Remember, Bernice’s show airs every Thursday evening at 9pm EST on Blog Talk Radio.

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Were you able to catch the broadcast earlier this week of the Genealogy Roadshow? This was a very fast-paced show allowing several groups of inquiring families to learn more about their own family history. The show had two co-hosts—Kenyatta Berry and D. Josh Taylor, who led the inquiring guests through the maze of their family histories. In some cases guests had only one pressing question—are they related to someone well known in history. Others wanted to know if they were eligible to join a lineage society like the DAR, and others had a quick question—would DNA tell them more about their ethnic and racial composition.
Anyway—the show is on PBS, and the next episode will air on Monday evening.
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I want to suggest that the act of collaboration be considered more for African American genealogists in particular. So many of our stories are missing on so many fronts! As a result, genealogists, historians, preservationists can work together. This is being done by writers such as the South Carolina researchers, the Heritage Seekers who wrote that wonderful book on Edgefield South Carolina African American history. The time might now be for others to combine their talent–writers, genealogists, historians, anthropologists, archaeologists–it is time perhaps to collaborate and tell the story. The old model of historians walking into a community, speaking with the locals, going away to write their books, and to never be heard from again–the time has perhaps come for them to alter the paradigm. All dimensions of the story are important, and all tellers of the story are important. Time for old barriers to be broken, and to travel down the same paths together.

Well, thanks for listening for another week, I know you are busy, and I appreciate your for taking your time out to tune in. Please in the meantime, keep researching, keep documenting, and keep sharing what you find.

African Roots Podcast Episode # 233 September 20, 2013

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Welcome back to the African Roots Podcast!
You can reach me at African Roost Podcast@gmail.com

A special shout out to the Heritage Seekers who are down in South Carolina this weekend attending the Old Edgefield Disctrict Genealogy Showcase. These were the people who got together to collaborated on the book project. The book is called No Longer Forgotten. The Ancestors Speak to Us. Their book will be released in December of this year, and it should really impress a lot of people in the genealogy community! Also the group of collaborators–the Heritage Seekers are speaking at the Town Hall later today! You know collaborations might be the wave of the future. Best wishes to them for a great weekend!

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From Delaware a website was shared with me, that contains slavery papers from 18th and 19th century Delaware. What an amazing website—the documents range from birth records, manumissions, and freedom petitions! This is something you don’t see often, and they were scanned in color. Visit THIS LINK to see these wonderful documents. These rest on the Delaware State archives website! Wonderful documents to see!

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Coming up in Ohio, the African American Special Interest Group at the Columbus Metropolitan Library in Columbus. Professor Paul J. Cook will be speaking as will Dr. Deborah Abbott. The event is $40 and will include lunch. For more information about this genealogy event, you can contact AAIG2013conference@aol.com for information.

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I talk often about finding the family’s freedom story. I have also asked the question why more communities don’t celebrate freedom and the Emancipation. How nice to see a celebration of Emancipation in Greenville Tennessee. October—-4-5th are the dates. It is the African American Heritage Alliance of East Tennessee ConferenceThis is not a genealogy event—but genealogy related one can say. The event will take place in Greenville TN. For more info click HERE.
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Speaking of Emancipation–I learned in an AfriGeneas chat yesterday that a community in Ohio has celebrated Emancipation for 150 years. What an amazing legacy. They celebrate the events around Septemeber 22 each year. This is historically the day that Abraham Lincoln actually signed the document. It took effect on January 1, but it was signed on September 22, in Gallia County Ohio. What a wonderful history and legacy! Emancipation Day weekend—-every year since 1863!!!! Amazing that we have never heard of this event!

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I hope that some of your will consider attending the upcoming AAHGS conference in Nashville Tennessee, in mid October. They are making it easy this year as you can now register online. For more information visit the website for more information.

Have a great week, and I hope you stay warm as autumn is here. In the meantime, have a great week of research and keep researching, keep documenting, and keep sharing what you find!