Monthly Archives: November 2009

African Roots Podcast #35 November 27, 2009

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Hello and welcome back!
Today is Friday November 27, 2009
My name is Angela Walton-Raji
And this is the African Roots Podcast!

San Diego Genealogical Society recently celebrated a major opening of a new research facility last week, and they are also offering a number of upcoming classes as well.
Also in San Diego—-

INDIVIDUAL HELP AT THE SAN DIEGO REGIONAL FHC
• African-American research: Margaret Lewis, 1st and 3rd Thursday of the month, 4:30-8:30 p.m. Margaret specializes in “Military Research” and “Researching Slaves in the Family.”
• Hispanic research: David Peña, 1st Wednesday of the month, 6:30-8:30 p.m. David is the Director of the Tijuana Family History Center.

Also in San Diego on December 5th
Sat., December 5, – – SAN DIEGO GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. Trip
Genealogy research trip to the Los Angeles Public Library. Registration form is at http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~casdgs/pdf/lalibrary200912.pdf.

December 11, 2008 Metropolitan Community College, Omaha, Nebraska, Author and genealogist will be giving a presentation. Contact Barbara Velázquez, for more information.

December 16
Those in or near Washington DC may want to mark their calendars to attend the National Archives book signing event, to hear noted author Annette Gordon Reed, author of the Hemingses of Monticello. The event is at 7 pm. Advance copies of the book can be reserved at a discount from the Archives bookstore by phoning 202-357-5271.

Congratulations to George Geder for launching his new videos. Also a thank you to George who mentioned that he was inspired by my own new site BeginningGenealogist.com I too have placed some instructional videos on the website and welcome some feedback from you out there.

As you recall the Chicago African American Genealogical Society is working on a Heritage book. The deadline for submissions to that project has been extended to December 15. Among the guidelines includes submission of a 500 word article plus a Black and White photograph.

Interesting article came out about black history of Laurel Cemetery in Weston, Missouri, near St. Joseph, Missouri.

The project began when a lifelong resident of the community Carolyn Larsen recalls that over 3000 black people resided at one time in that community and yet, the colored section was so empty. She knew people were once there, so she made a decision to find their stories.

This story teaches all of us a lesson to tell the story of the entire community—to see the forest as well as appreciate the trees in that forest. We should all try to tell the story of the community as well as our own families. Let’s find inspiration from this story to document our own communities.

Thank you for listening this week. In the meantime, keep researching, keep documenting, and keep sharing what you find.

(For previous episodes, click on the date of each episode to activitate the podcast.)

African Roots Podcast #34 November 20, 2009

This Week's Pod Cast

 

Hello and welcome back!
Today is Friday November 20, 2009
My name is Angela Walton-Raji
And this is the African Roots Podcast!

Upcoming Events:
November 21
St. Louis
A screening of the Emmy nominated film Traces of the Trade will take place at the St. Louis Museum of History from 1-3 pm. After the screening, a panel discussion will follow. This films depicts the story of Katrina Brown who discovered her family ties to the largest slave owning family in American history, and her journey of discovery and healing. The event is hosted by the St. Louis African American Genealogy Society. Information can be obtained here.

Cherokee County Georgia seeks information about the local black community. They are learning a lot about the community as they are digitizing and preserving the personal papers of Mrs. Magnolia Thomas a well known educator from the town of Woodstock GA in Cherokee County. It is hoped that others from the black community will also donate their personal papers to the historical society so that more will be learned about the community’s African American lives.

November 20-21 2009
Attention book lovers—-the Georgia Archives is having a major book sale. 25,000 books are going on sale this week at the state Archives. As inexpensive as $1, some major finds can be at this book sale event. The sale will go throughout the weekend and booklovers will have a grand time pouring over thousands of titles.

ROOTSMAGIC is offering some of its software for free. ROOTSMAGIC Essentials is now offering a modified version of their major software program, providing basic record keeping for beginning genealogists. I must point out that there are also other free programs available for new genealogists as well, including the PAF (Personal Ancestral File) offered by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Legacy Software is also free and can be downloaded as well. After one has developed some experience they may wish to later upgrade to the full ROOTSMAGIC program, or purchase other programs such as Family Tree Maker, The Master Genealogist.

November 23 residents of Wellington Kansas will have a chance to listen to Col. George M. Boyd who served in WWII as a Tuskegee Airman. He will speak at 6:30 pm at the Wellington Steakhouse and the meeting is free to the public. Additional information can be obtained by phoning (620) 326-3401.

December 16
Those in or near Washington DC may want to mark their calendars to attend the National Archives book signing event, to hear noted author Annette Gordon Reed, author of the Hemingses of Monticello. The event is at 7 pm. Advance copies of the book can be reserved at a discount from the Archives bookstore by phoning 202-357-5271.

There are some lessons to be learned from Magnolia Thomas of Woodstock Georgia. She is the teacher whose personal papers are being scanned and digitized. As researchers we all know the value of documentation, but have we considered the need to tell our own personal stories in addition to the stories of our ancestors? Are we keeping our letters, and journals and diaries? Are our own photos documented and preserved for the next generation? 100 years from now, our descendants—whether collateral or direct—will appreciate getting a glimpse into our own lives if we leave the evidence for them to follow. Let us appreciate that we are in a special place—between two periods of time, the past with all of its challenges and the future with all of its promises. Remember those yet to come as you continue to do what you do, documenting and telling your own story.

Thanks for listening and have a HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

Keep researching, keep documenting and keep sharing what you find!

(For previous episodes, click on the date of each episode to activitate the podcast.)